On Thursday, 19 June 2017 at 6:30 P.M. in the Senior Citizen Center, we held our monthly membership meeting with President F. Martell Grover directing and who gave a welcome to fifty-five members and guests. Guests recognized were Ron and Brenda Garner, Gordon and Cheryl Williams, Steve Bunnell, Doug and Jill Conway and Steve Parkinson (who joined earlier this year).

The Opening song was “America the Beautiful” with Sylvia Walker at the piano and Carol Ladle directing. The Opening prayer was offered by Doug Ladle. The pledge of allegiance was led by Alton Wilde.

We then enjoyed an awesome meal provided by Alton and Paula Wilde and their food committee. It consisted of various soups and bread with a dessert of apple pie and ice cream. Birthdays and Anniversaries that occurred since our last Membership meeting were recognized by Ken Hart.

Louis Clements presented a short history of the Telephone service in Rexburg. Some significant points made were that 1883 was the first telephone in Idaho. 1897 the first telephone company, the Snake River Telephone Company, in Rexburg with 12 customers. In 1911 Mountain Bell bought out the Snake River Telephone Company and had 139 customers. This continued to increase until in 1972 there were 8,142 telephones in Madison County with 6,500 of those in the city of Rexburg. At the time they had ten operators serving.

Doug Ladle introduced the speaker for the evening, David Davis, who was accompanied by his wife, Charley. He is from the Rexburg Fire Department and had been a seminary teacher when Brother Ladle first knew him. In 1988 he went on a mission to British Columbia, Canada. He also drove a bus for the Fire Fighters in West Yellowstone, Montana. He currently is the Assistant Fire Chief in the Madison Fire Protection District.

His message for the evening was on the history of the Fire Department in Madison County. As he moved through his talk he showed pictures of the various designs of the Fire Station from 1910 until the present time and told the reasons for the increase in the size and capability of the building.

Part way into his talk Brother Davis had three members of the Rexburg Fire Department bag pipers present three numbers. The numbers were “Scotland, the Brave”, “Amazing Grace” and “Bells of Dun Blane”. Brother Davis explained that each Fire Department has a distinguishing tartan that represents its clan and each bagpiper has a distinguishing emblem on their stockings.

He said that in 1976 the name of the Fire Department was changed to “Madison Fire Protection District” with three Fire Departments, Rexburg, Sugar City and Madison County. Because each area had their own funds and equipment, it was difficult to remember which fire equipment belonged to which entity so they had red trucks for Rexburg and Sugar City and yellow for Madison County. In 1984 Funds were provided so that they could have a unified system which solved some of these problems.

He described the methods of fighting fires and that they started with one person initially who
Stayed in the station with volunteer firemen who came when needed. At the present they have: 20 career fire fighters/EMT or Paramedic, 5 live-in Fire Fighters/EMT, 5 class A pumpers, 1 109 foot Areal or ladder truck, three 3,000 gallon water trailers, 7 wild land engines (which brings revenue back to the Fire Department when they go to help fight wild fires in other areas), 2 Rescue trucks, various commercial vehicles and trailers and 6 Ambulances. The Madison Fire Department protects 450 Square miles with a population of 38,273 people.

In 1998, because of needing a place to be housed, the ambulance and drivers were admitted to the Fire station. In 2001 a fire station was built and manned in Archer.

They have received 530 calls a year for their fire trucks and 2,500 calls a year for the ambulances.

He concluded his talk with a question and answer session wherein many useful and informative items were covered.

President Grover announced the ticket number for the door prize. The prize was Volume 4 of the Rexburg History compiled by the Madison County Historical Society and was won by Bob Pyle.

The closing prayer was offered by Ken Hart.

 

 

 

 

 

On Thursday, 21 September 2017 at 6:30 P.M. in The Senior Citizen Center, we held our monthly membership meeting with President F. Martell Grover directing and who gave a welcome to forty-four members and guests. He gave a thought as follows: “We cannot change the cards we are dealt, just how we play the hand.” By Randy Pausch

Opening song “My Country, ‘tis of thee” led by Carol Ladle and accompanied by Sylvia Walker.
Opening Prayer, Conrad Jensen
Pledge of Allegiance led by Allen Morton
Dan Porter introduced the guests in attendance: Jesse Rasmussen, Gordon and Cheryl Williams and Dave Brown.

Dinner was served prepared by Alton Wilde and his food committee. It consisted of Sloppy Joes, Buns, Tossed Green Salad with dressings and an assortment of cookies.

Business:
Doug Ladle reported on the 23 July Pioneer Day Fireside.

President Grover reported on the National Sons of Utah Pioneers Convention in Centerville, Utah, on the meetings, food, day treks, entertainment, presentations, etc. as follows:

On Thursday evening we were welcomed with the SUP Convention Ceremonies from the Centerville Convention Chairman and the National President, John Elggren. After which a buffet meal was served.

On Friday we were offered four tour choices: Full Day Trek
1. Travel the Pioneer trail from Echo Canyon to this is the Place Monument – this was a full day tour of travel on to I-84 into Morgan country. Followed the trail of the Mormon wagon trains coming from Wyoming into Utah. Goal was to come down what now is called Weber Canyon but the Hells Canyon Pass was too narrow for the wagons to come through. Had to travel south to Emigration Canon to enter into the Salt Lake Valley. Emigration Canyon was very steep, with rocks and boulders to move around. First group came into the Salt Lake Valley a few days before Brigham Young on the July 24th.
2. Half-day treks which were offered in the morning and again in the afternoon:
a. Antelope Island
b. Church History Museum in Downtown Salt Lake City.
c. Hill Aerospace Museum at Hill Air Force Base.

 

Saturday Morning
1. The member’s spouses were offered a meeting with Jenny Reeder and Janice Johnson. They are authors of Witness of Women, which is firsthand experiences and testimonies of the women from the early restoration. They both have completed a number of other church history projects. Sisters were greatly blessed for attending.
2. Membership of the SUP met in a business meeting:
a. Financial Report
b. Trail Marker/Web Site – Changes taking place with Web Site
c. Pioneer Magazine
d. Presidential Reports from Jim Hurst, Past President, Keith Van Rossendaal, President-Elect, and John Elggren, President.
e. Key Note Speaker at the noon luncheon was Glenn Rawson – known for his Sunday Radio special spiritual stories, Joseph Smith Papers and History of the Saints.
3. Changes to take place in the future:
a. “SUP National Convention” title to change back to SUP National Trek”.
b. National officers will no longer be coming out of Salt Lake Valley. Each Chapter may make recommendations for National President to the Election Committee.
c. National officers will take office at the end of the National Convention (trek) in September next year (has been taking place in January).
d. Next September National trek will be hosted by the Cedar City Chapter on September 20-22 2018.
e. The estimated attendance for this National Convention was about 280 to 300.

Bill Eckersell gave a report on Chapter Monuments. He told of the Chapter’s first placement of monument on the North Side of the Tabernacle.

President Grover presented a certificate and a print of Wagons West to Bonnie Jackman for her great service to this chapter over many years.

Ken Hart recognized birthdays and Anniversaries and introduced the evening’s speaker, Louis
Clements.

SUP Newsletter
Upper Snake River Valley Chapter
September 2017

On Thursday, 21 September 2017 at 6:30 P.M. in The Senior Citizen Center, we held our monthly membership meeting with President F. Martell Grover directing and who gave a welcome to forty-four members and guests. He gave a thought as follows: “We cannot change the cards we are dealt, just how we play the hand.” By Randy Pausch

Opening song “My Country, ‘tis of thee” led by Carol Ladle and accompanied by Sylvia Walker.
Opening Prayer, Conrad Jensen
Pledge of Allegiance led by Allen Morton
Dan Porter introduced the guests in attendance: Jesse Rasmussen, Gordon and Cheryl Williams and Dave Brown.

Dinner was served prepared by Alton Wilde and his food committee. It consisted of Sloppy Joes, Buns, Tossed Green Salad with dressings and an assortment of cookies.

Business:
Doug Ladle reported on the 23 July Pioneer Day Fireside.

President Grover reported on the National Sons of Utah Pioneers Convention in Centerville, Utah, on the meetings, food, day treks, entertainment, presentations, etc. as follows:

On Thursday evening we were welcomed with the SUP Convention Ceremonies from the Centerville Convention Chairman and the National President, John Elggren. After which a buffet meal was served.

On Friday we were offered four tour choices: Full Day Trek
1. Travel the Pioneer trail from Echo Canyon to this is the Place Monument – this was a full day tour of travel on to I-84 into Morgan country. Followed the trail of the Mormon wagon trains coming from Wyoming into Utah. Goal was to come down what now is called Weber Canyon but the Hells Canyon Pass was too narrow for the wagons to come through. Had to travel south to Emigration Canon to enter into the Salt Lake Valley. Emigration Canyon was very steep, with rocks and boulders to move around. First group came into the Salt Lake Valley a few days before Brigham Young on the July 24th.
2. Half-day treks which were offered in the morning and again in the afternoon:
a. Antelope Island
b. Church History Museum in Downtown Salt Lake City.
c. Hill Aerospace Museum at Hill Air Force Base.

 

Saturday Morning
1. The member’s spouses were offered a meeting with Jenny Reeder and Janice Johnson. They are authors of Witness of Women, which is firsthand experiences and testimonies of the women from the early restoration. They both have completed a number of other church history projects. Sisters were greatly blessed for attending.
2. Membership of the SUP met in a business meeting:
a. Financial Report
b. Trail Marker/Web Site – Changes taking place with Web Site
c. Pioneer Magazine
d. Presidential Reports from Jim Hurst, Past President, Keith Van Rossendaal, President-Elect, and John Elggren, President.
e. Key Note Speaker at the noon luncheon was Glenn Rawson – known for his Sunday Radio special spiritual stories, Joseph Smith Papers and History of the Saints.
3. Changes to take place in the future:
a. “SUP National Convention” title to change back to SUP National Trek”.
b. National officers will no longer be coming out of Salt Lake Valley. Each Chapter may make recommendations for National President to the Election Committee.
c. National officers will take office at the end of the National Convention (trek) in September next year (has been taking place in January).
d. Next September National trek will be hosted by the Cedar City Chapter on September 20-22 2018.
e. The estimated attendance for this National Convention was about 280 to 300.

Bill Eckersell gave a report on Chapter Monuments. He told of the Chapter’s first placement of monument on the North Side of the Tabernacle.

President Grover presented a certificate and a print of Wagons West to Bonnie Jackman for her great service to this chapter over many years.

Ken Hart recognized birthdays and Anniversaries and introduced the evening’s speaker, Louis
Clements.

Louis Clements shared details about the founding and development of Rexburg. His presentation included some humorous events in Rexburg’s history that few in the audience had known. He also described the development of the layout of Rexburg’s streets, the canal system, and the development of the business district of the city.

President Grover directed the door prize drawing which was won by Bonnie Jackman and Dave Brown. They each were given a copy of Volume one of the Rexburg History.

Sylvia Walker played a piano solo entitled “I Love You”.

Closing prayer was offered by Martha Jensen.

NOTE: The Election of our President Elect will be in the October Membership meeting.

Louis Clements shared details about the founding and development of Rexburg. His presentation included some humorous events in Rexburg’s history that few in the audience had known. He also described the development of the layout of Rexburg’s streets, the canal system, and the development of the business district of the city.

President Grover directed the door prize drawing which was won by Bonnie Jackman and Dave Brown. They each were given a copy of Volume one of the Rexburg History.

Sylvia Walker played a piano solo entitled “I Love You”.

Closing prayer was offered by Martha Jensen.

NOTE: The Election of our President Elect will be in the October Membership meeting.

SUP Newsletter
Upper Snake River Valley Chapter
July 2017

On 23 July 2017 a 24th of July Fireside was held at 7 P.M. in the North Rexburg Stake Chapel
The Theme was “Our Pioneer and Pioneering Educators: Teachers Who Make a Difference,”
attended by 264 Chapter Members and Guests. Prior to the beginning of the program a series of numbered slides were shown of schools in the Upper Snake River Valley. A handout was given to each person to write down the name of the seventeen school buildings in the appropriately numbered space.

A welcome and Opening comments were given by
President F. Martell Grover.

Opening song: “Firm as the Mountains Around Us”
Pianist: Sylvia Walker
Conductor: Carol Ladle
Pledge of Allegiance led by Ken Hart, President Elect
Invocation: Jerry Glenn

Doug Ladle, Event Chairman, presented the Theme.
He reviewed the answers to the Preprogram Quiz
on Area School buildings. Then presented the “Preserving Our Educational Heritage” Award to four of the outstanding historians in the Southeast Idaho area. They were Louis Clements, Lowell and Mardi Parkinson, Harold Forbush and Robert Worrell. (Picture is available for Louis Clements only. Robert Worrell was unavailable, Lowell and Mardi were unable to attend and Harold Forbush is deceased but was represented by his son, Kirby Forbush.
He also showed everyone the new SUP Upper Snake River Valley web site which has information about the SUP and our Chapter, plus the list of those who had been nominated as “Teachers Who Make a Difference” in Madison Schools, Sugar Salem Schools, Ricks College/BYU Idaho, and other educators.
There are 370 of them. The results can be accessed at PioneersRexburg.org by clicking on
NEWS in the left hand column and then scrolling to the School results you want to see.
Following the above he introduced the speakers for the evening, they spoke as follows:

 

Jim Gee spoke on Teachers of the Sugar-Salem School District. He mentioned his parents, who taught for a number of years in the district, Glenn Dalling, who coached and taught in the Sugar-Salem school district, Eddy Eaten and
also Verla Lusk, who was his English Teacher. She was instrumental in helping him gain confidence in his ability to write and in his usage of the English language. He feels that the old adage really does apply today which says “It doesn’t matter how much you know until they see how much you care.” The teachers whom he knows were much more interested in the development of the student than in the amount of their salaries.

 

Lane Hemming spoke on Teachers of the Madison School District. He said that the teachers at Madison High School at every level from Elementary through High School were an unselfish group of people, who while their salaries were low, were more interested in the welfare of the students than the amount they were paid. He had an Uncle Tom Hemming, who played on the basketball team coached by Lowell Biddulph which went to the National High School boys basketball tournament in Chicago, Illinois in 1930. Funds were raised by the local community so they could go.
Others were Drew Cooper, who suffered exposure to mustard gas during WWI which maimed him for life, but who
dedicated his life to successfully teaching young people. An outstanding music program which was begun by Jay Slaughter and Hal Barton has become a tradition at Madison High School. Jay Slaughter came from the University of Utah with a high stepping very successful method for the marching band. David Hinck came twenty years ago and has had his music programs recognized statewide. Then there was Norman Holman and Val Dalling who had as great a positive effect on the student body of Madison High School as anyone he has known. Some of the less notable ones, but never the less effective with the students were custodians Freddie Reese at the high school and John Pearson at Adams Elementary school. John Pearson had been a very successful farmer at one time, but lost everything during the depression.
His final summary was that educators at Madison Schools, at every level, have always been dedicated and effective in influencing in a positive way the lives of the students.

 

 

 

Donna Jean Kinghorns spoke on Teachers of Ricks College and BYU Idaho. “As a child, growing up in the Rexburg area, I thought, from the way my parents and other family members talked about Ricks College that it must be an enchanted, wonderful place, because they spoke of their experiences there with such enthusiasm and fondness.”

The faculty at Ricks College were committed to their profession and were very unselfish with their time and talents. Nearly every professor not only carried a full teaching load, but advised and assisted in so many ways in at least one club or student activity also. They truly cared about their students. She mentioned Lowell and Ruth Biddulph, Helen Lamprech, Harold Nelsen, Norman Ricks and others.

President Henry B. Eyring, the first President Eyring, said this about the faculty of Ricks in an April 1975 Ensign interview: “We have some truly great scholars at Ricks College: faculty members who are publishing, not because that is the number one priority on our campus, but because they simply are continuing to advance and discover. I have taught at colleges where the driving force was survival. If you were not a creative publishing scholar, you could not stay at the college. We maintain the emphasis on the student. If a teacher is a nurturing teacher, as well as a scholar, he can be at Ricks College….this permits an extremely high quality of faculty-student relationships. For example, there is a Ricks professor who is leading his field in aspects of life science research; he is also tremendously involved in the lives of his students. Often, as I pass his office, there is a student from the rodeo team with him. That’s because he happens to like horses. And if a boy can’t get a special kind of help anywhere else, he gets it there.” Of course President Eyring was talking about Mel Griffith.

Ricks College professors touched and changed lives for the better. Even with the tremendous growth that BYU-I has experienced, the professors there continue this practice.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Brent Hill noted that the influence of a teacher extends far beyond the students he teaches. He told of Oliver Cowdery, who came from a New England family with strong traditions of patriotism, learning, and religion. It was while teaching at the village school in Manchester, NY, and living with the Smith family that Cowdery first heard about Joseph Smith and the Book of Mormon.
Today we are the beneficiaries of the early Saints who taught their children to read and write. Hundreds of hand-written journals provide us with the history of Mormonism and America. Without those who taught, there would be no record of our heritage.
Hill recounted the persecutions endured by early church members and the pleas to their government for redress. Petitions to the State of Missouri, to President Martin Van Buren, and even to Congress, were ignored or rebuked.
After the murder of their prophet by a mob, the surviving Saints were driven from their homes and led west on an exodus by Brigham Young.
As they were making their trek across Iowa, the U.S. Army asked for a contingent of men to serve in the Mexican War. The nation that had rejected them was now asking for fathers to abandon their fleeing families and risk their own lives defending America. The Mormon Pioneers answered the call with patriotic fervor and volunteers, known as the Mormon Battalion, marched over 2,000 miles by foot to serve their country.
The early Saints taught us the real values of this nation even when we are faced with difficult challenges. Through persecution and oppression, even when it appeared that their country had failed them, the Mormon Pioneers maintained their loyalty and patriotism for the United States of America.
Closing Song: “America the Beautiful”
Pianist: Sylvia Walker, Conductor: Carol Ladle
Closing Prayer: Alton Wilde, Former President of our SUP Chapter

Refreshments were served in the Cultural Hall

SUP Newsletter
Upper Snake River Valley Chapter
June 2017

On Thursday, 15 June 2017 at 6:30 P.M. in the Senior Citizen Center, we held our monthly membership meeting with President F. Martell Grover directing and who gave a welcome
to twenty-nine members and guests. His description of the meeting is as follows:

Greetings Chapter Member and Historical Society Members, “We had a wonderful membership meeting Thursday evening. Prelude music was played by Sylvia Walker and thirty members and their spouses were welcomed. The Opening Prayer was offered by Dan Porter and the Pledge of Allegiance was led by Louis Clements. Birthdays and Anniversaries were acknowledged for the month of June and July. Dinner by the Food Committee was served which consisted of Sliced Ham, Scalloped Potatoes, Buttered Corn, Rolls and Butter and Jam with Cake for dessert.

The historical moment was given by Louis Clements. He shared old newspaper clippings about reactions to the first cars to come to Rexburg.

 

Sylvia Walker then provided us some very

uplifting music.  She played old tunes, including

“Smoke Gets In Your Eyes.”

 

 


President F. Martell Grover introduced the speaker for tonight, Allen Morton, who will speak on the upcoming eclipse of the sun. Brother Morton has had a lifelong interest in the solar system and has traveled to distant places to watch eclipses. He told how as a young man, he built an observatory in his backyard. Parley P. Pratt brought the first telescope to the Salt Lake Valley. As technology has advanced, the observations of the sun, stars and moon are more accurate and beautiful. Brother Morton also gave suggestions and guidelines on how to watch the upcoming solar eclipse. Brother Morton was very knowledgeable on this topic and it all was very interesting.

 

 

The closing prayer was offered by George Quarez

On Monday 19 June 2017 five of our chapter members and spouses car-pooled to Pocatello, Idaho, and joined with the Pocatello, Blackfoot and Idaho Falls chapters of the SUP in visiting the Fort Hall Replica and the Museum which is next door to the Replica. The museum with all its wonderful displays was enjoyable for all to see. There was a $3.00 per person fee to enter both the Replica and the Museum.

Following the tour we met at the Ross Park for an SUP regional picnic about noon. The trek was hosted by the Upper Snake River Valley Chapter and provided the fried chicken and eating supplies. The other chapters brought assorted salads, desserts, and drinks.

Each Chapter leader reported on some of the outstanding events that had occurred during the past year. The time together was a special time to fellowship and renew friendships and build a togetherness among the members of the other three chapters!

Our Chapter extended an invitation to the other chapters to join us on our next trek to Salmon, Idaho on 17 July to tour the Sacajawea Cultural Center and local historical sights. Two seventeen passenger vans have been reserved for this trek.

 

SUP Newsletter May 2017 three with picturesSUP Newsletter May 2017 three with picturesOn Monday, 15 May 2017 members and spouses of our Chapter car-pooled to Blackfoot, Idaho, and had an awesome experience of viewing historical items that are at the Potato Museum. After reading several enlightening and interesting posters we watched four video segments about Potato farming in Idaho. Of special interest was several people in the videos with whom we are personally acquainted. From there we saw examples of equipment used from the time potatoes were first planted and harvested in this area until the current period. What an improvement time has had on the efficiency of the potato industry. It was a wonderful visit and afterward we also enjoyed the tasty baked potatoes with the many toppings available in the cafe which is part of the museum.

We also met on the 18th of May at 6:30 P.M. President F. Martell Grover directed and gave a welcome to 52 members and guests at our Membership meeting. He gave a thought of Audre Lorde, “When we speak, we are afraid our words will not be heard or welcome. But when we are silent, we are still afraid. So it is better to speak.”
The Opening prayer was offered by Max W. Brown and the Pledge of Allegiance by Harvy Jackman. Harvy reminded us that the Pledge had been changed a couple of times. One time at the start of World War II when extending the arm out was stopped because it resembled the Nazi salute. Another time the words “Under God” were added.

The Madison High School choir consisting of 11 members and directed by David Hinteck sang two numbers, “My Heart Stood Still” and “Autumn Leaves”. Their presentation was thoroughly enjoyed by everyone in attendance.

Alton and Paula Wilde shared their mission call as missionaries at the BYU Idaho Family History Center, Assistant Recorders at the Idaho Falls Temple on Wednesday nights and ordinance workers at the Idaho Falls Temple on Saturday AM shift. He then announced the evening’s delightful menu of tossed salad, fruit salad, bread and butter, cookies and ice cream. While everyone was eating the following was shared.
Jerry Glenn reported that Gail Cazier had suffered a massive stroke and was in Hospice Care at home. It was also announced that Philip Wightman and his wife were in an automobile accident in Tetonia, Idaho, and were in the Rexburg Memorial Hospital initially but were later transferred to an Idaho Falls hospital.
President Grover asked Bill Eckersell and Dan Porter to report on the Trek to the Blackfoot Potato Museum where we went on May 15th. They both reported it was a great experience. Bill said he liked he animated potato family and Dan said he enjoyed seeing people he knew in the video presentations. President Grover then asked Beverly Skinner to report on the Symposium they had attended. She indicated that they spoke about Joseph Smith, Brigham Young and Wilford Woodruff in the morning session and spoke about the similarities between the experience of Joseph Smith and Abraham Lincoln in the afternoon session. During the evening session President Cecil O. Samuelson of the Salt Lake Temple spoke.
Ron Gibb asked for volunteers to help to set up and take down chairs and the Pledge of Allegiance for the Daughters of Utah Pioneers Regional Conference that is to be held this Saturday.
Doug Ladle described the program for the July 24th Fireside to be held on Sunday the 23rd. The theme will be “Pioneering Educations Who Made a Difference”. Helping with the program will be Jim Gee from the Sugar-Salem school system, Lane Hemming from the Madison school system and Donna Jean Kinghorn from the Ricks College/BYU Idaho system. Doug asked us to submit names of educators in our lives from those districts.
Lewis Clements reviewed the history of the Rexburg Chamber of Commerce from 1906 until the present. In 1906 it was a Commercial Club with Charles H. Woodmansee as President and there were 44 men who signed the charter. The dues were $25.00 per year which was later reduced to an annual dues of $5.00 plus $1.00 per month.
They met in various places over the years, including banks and any place that had room for a group. In our time they met at Rudd & Company, the Teton Flood Museum, East Main Square, the Conference room at Frontiers Pies, north side of Main Street, and now the upstairs of the Medicine Shop.
In 1907, they contributed $4,000 for the construction of the Ricks Academy Gymnasium. In 1908, they encouraged a “Shop at Home” program. In 1909, they raised $700 for the purchase of land for a railroad depot in Rexburg and over the years have sponsored Fourth of July activities, parades, patriotic meetings, baseball games, horse racing and other activities.
From 1910 until 1919 they promoted an East-West branch line of the railroad; met with the city to demand a city stop light on Main Street; and obtained eight train cars of hay from Kansas because of a hay shortage in this area.
In 1926, they changed the name of the organization to Chamber of Commerce and in 1929 they began the Whoopee day’s activities. In 1930 they had a massive fund raiser to raise $1,500 to send the Madison High School Stake Champions to Chicago to compete in the National Championship. Conley Watts was on this team.
During the thirties they had three resolutions, 1. Keep the road open from Rexburg to Teton basin in the winter.
2. Build a road to Old Faithful through Bechler Meadows (Cave Falls). 3. Establish a state park east of Blackfoot at Wolverine Canon. In 1939, the first Famers/Merchants banquet was held.
In the 1940s a crisis was averted in the farming community when the Chamber asked all businesses to close for one day during the week plus half days on Wed thru Fri to help with the Sugar Beet harvest. The WWII draft had devastated the regular work force. In 1946, they established a ski run in Mill Hollow and until the current time have accomplished many other noteworthy things.
Ken Hart introduced the guest speaker
Denice Johnson. The theme for her talk was “Faithful Women of the Early Church and Women’s experiences and testimonies of the Restoration.” She described how tapestries as they age become faded, but can be restored to near their original colors. She then compared this to the lives of people as the restoration takes place in their lives. She mentioned several women as examples of this.
Some early publications identified and recognized women in the Church including “The Women of Mormondom” by Edward W. Tulledge and the Women’s Exponent which was published from 1872-1914 for which Brigham Young called as editor Emmeline Smith. It had brief sketches of Church Women of Zion.
Laura Farnsworth Owens stated that, “I longed for union and for Latter-day glory; and my happy soul is a witness.” This came as a result of the challenges she had when she joined the Church. She was a member of the Presbyterian Church at the time of her conversion to the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. The Minister excommunicated her when others in his congregation joined our Church. He said many bad and incorrect things about her, which caused her to write and publish a tract in her own defense.
Eliza R. Snow took four years to convert to the Church because she wanted to be sure she was doing the right thing, but when she did she said, “My Heart was fixed.”
Zina D. H. Young was fourteen when she read the Book of Mormon and knew immediately that it was true. She said, “It is true, true, true.”
Mary Whitmer, wife of David Whitmer, had become so overloaded with work because of having Joseph Smith and additional people in her home that she was about ready to kick them all out, but she went out to the barn and was met by an older gentleman (some say he was Moroni). He showed her the gold plates from which the Book of Mormon was translated. With this she had the opportunity to gain her own testimony of its truthfulness and was not bothered by her concern any more.
Ann Marsh, Thomas Marsh’s sister, wrote a copy of Section 89 of the Doctrine and Covenants (The Word of Wisdom) which she retained all her life and which she referred to often. It is still in existence.
Mary Fielding Smith was a very faithful member of the Church although very lonely at times in Kirtland, Ohio, because her husband was serving as a missionary for the Church. One time she wrote a note to her Sister which said, “I don’t know what I am going to do!”
Melissa Dodge was blind since birth. At her baptism she was blessed by David W. Patten and recovered her eye sight.
Jennetta Richards, who had the same last name as her husband Willard, enjoyed association with the Mormon Missionaries because her father welcomed the LDS missionaries until many of his congregation began joining the Mormon Church. When she decided to marry William Richards he and his congregation tried to discourage her from doing so. Prior to her death at 36 years of age she wrote a letter to Joseph Smith saying, “Please let me have my husband back as you have had him long enough and I need him. Willard and Jennetta spent much time in the garden together after that until her death.
A drawing for the door prize was held with Jerry Glenn winning the book, “Voices of the Past, Volume #3 and Beverly Skinner winning a copy of “The Snake River Echoes.”
President Grover announced that the speaker for the June Membership meeting would be Alan Marton who would talk about the Solar Eclipse that will occur in August.
The closing prayer was offered by Hettie Brown

The Sons of Utah Pioneers Chapter met 16 March at 6:30 P.M. President F. Martell Grover directed and gave a welcome to 38 members, spouses and guests at our Membership meeting. The opening hymn was “Love One Another” with Gordon Timothy directing and Janet Timothy accompanying on the piano. The opening prayer was offered by Doug Ladle and the Pledge of Allegiance was led by Ron Gibb.

A special flute musical number, “Christ the Lord is Risen Today,” was performed by Sarah Kissner.

Lynn Bradshaw, the SUP Area Vice President was recognized. We then all enjoyed baked potatoes and chili with salad and a variety of cupcakes for desert, prepared under the direction of our Food
Chairman, Alton Wilde and his wife Paula. During the time we were eating Ken Hart recognized those with birthdays and anniversaries during the month of March. A highlight was the anniversary of  William and Marie Skinner who have been married for 65 years.

Louis Clements then described the history of the Rexburg City Hall from 1906 to Present. From 1906 until 1908 it was in a building near where El Gene’s business is located. From 1908 to 1909 it was in the basement of the First National Bank. From 1909 to 1975 there was a new building where the Fire Department is now located.

In 1975 they moved to the Hemming Office Building and in 1976 when the Teton Dam broke they moved into a trailer until a new building was finished. In 1983 there was a natural gas explosion which required them to move to the Ricks Craft Printing building until 1985. They later moved to where they currently are housed on North First East. He said the first Mayor was Henry Flamm.

Douglas Ladle introduced the Speaker for the evening, Chuck Porter, who spoke on the Legacy of the Porter family in Rexburg. The Porter family started their first business in 1917, a book store. His Grandfather came to America after being in England, Australia and New Zealand and after his wife passed away. He initially went to Salt Lake City, Utah, then to Logan, Utah, and afterward came to Rexburg. During that time he also went on a mission to Switzerland where he learned to speak both German, and French. He came to Rexburg to teach Physics and Botany and several other courses at Ricks Academy. Because he needed extra income he purchased a printing business, the Rexburg Standard, for $150.00. He also served as Mayor of Rexburg for a time.

In 1949-50 his brother John Porter bought a newspaper, the Rexburg Journal, so that now the Porter family owned both of the Rexburg newspapers. However, one was a Democrat and the other Republican but in spite of this they both respected each other and were great friends.

Sometimes if one had a breakdown in their shop, the other brother would help with the printing. With a difference of opinion of some kind, Warren Porter, Chuck’s father, who had ten children and all worked with printing the Rexburg Standard, could put out an extra edition on Friday to reinforce his ideas. John Porter’s Rexburg Journal couldn’t do so because he only had one daughter who didn’t like to work in the printing business. Later the Rexburg Standard and Rexburg Journal were combined under the ownership of the Porter Family and is known as the Rexburg Standard Journal.

Porter’s acquired the Porter’s bookstore through accepting a note from a friend who couldn’t pay it off. They afterward built a greeting card company north of Rexburg which does an international business. In 1983 Chuck Porter Came back to Rexburg to work for his Grandfather Arthur Porter in the Bookstore. Following Chuck’s family history, Lynn Smith presented a Certificate of Appreciation to Chuck Porter.

Lynn Bradshaw, Area Vice President, presented a certificate and lapel pin to William Skinner because he is now a life member in the Sons of Utah Pioneers. He is #3210 on the life wall of the National SUP office in Salt Lake City, Utah. Marie Skinner was present when he received the award and at the request of Lynn Bradshaw she rewarded him with a kiss.

Brother Bradshaw said, “I believe that this is the first time that a wife has given her husband a kiss when he received a life membership at an SUP Membership meeting.”

Martell Grover announced that the April Membership

meeting would be “Bring a Friend night” and encouraged us all to bring a friend. The evening’s program will be recognizing the 25 th anniversary of our Charter and Jerry Glenn, a charter member, will review our chapter history. Also the SUP National President-Elect, Keith Van Roosendaal, will be attending.

He also presented Moana Boyle with the door prize, a copy of the Rexburg History, and she offered the closing prayer.